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Analysing closed context assemblages: what can we find out from finds. Case study from the Copper Age site of Črečan
Lea Čataj  1@  
1 : Croatian Conservation Institute  (HRZ)  -  Site web
Grskoviceva 23 10 000 Zagreb -  Croatie

The site Črečan, situated in Northern Croatia, has been excavated (small scale) since 2015. The site was occupied during Copper Age, Early Bronze Age and Early Iron Age. Thanks to the thick sediment, the site was almost undisturbed till the 21st century. In the 2017 excavations it was noticed that the only Early Bronze Age pit is dug through almost 50 cm thick sediment layer covering the Copper Age Features of the site. 

The excavations were focused on the earliest, Early/Middle Copper Age period, dated to the 2nd half of the 5th millennium. Successive usage of space was detected, spanning from the Latest Phase of Sopot to the Late Phase of Lasinja Culture, as evidenced by nine calibrated dates, stratigraphy and pottery.

Parts of two large and several smaller pits were excavated. Pottery and lithic assemblages were analysed, regarding both typology and technology. The obvious difference in the inventory of the two large pits indicates their different function. One of the pits is particularly interesting since it contained more than 60 clay spoons, several pieces of vessels with visible organic residue and a large amount of different lithic tools as well as the debris from its production.

Although flotation was conducted on 18 samples (6 to 20 l per sample) of soil from archaeological context, the results were scarce due to the high acidity of the soil (pH value measured on 7 samples). Nevertheless, some plant remains were recovered which, together with sickle gloss visible on several lithic tools indicate farming activities.

The results of both excavations as well as different analysis conducted on archaeological samples and finds will be presented in an attempt to interpret the archaeological data obtained so far.


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