Programmes > Par auteur > Gollette Lisa

The variability of frontal and occipital features of H. erectus: a comparative analysis of unpublished Indonesian fossils
Lisa Gollette  1, *@  , Florent Detroit  2@  , Neni Trilusiana Rahmawati  3@  , Dominique Grimaud-Herve  4@  
1 : UMR 7194 - HNHP - Département Homme et Environnement (MNHN)
Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle - MNHN (FRANCE)
Musée de l'Homme, Place du Trocadéro, 75016 Paris -  France
2 : UMR 7194 - HNHP - Département Homme et Environnement (MNHN)  (MNHN)
Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle - MNHN (FRANCE)
Musée de l'Homme, Place du Trocadéro, Paris -  France
3 : Laboratory Bio- and Paleoanthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Gadja Mada
Laboratory Bio- and Paleoanthropology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Gadja Mada, Yogyakarta -  Indonésie
4 : UMR 7194 - HNHP - Département Homme et Environnement  (MNHN)  -  Site web
Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle - MNHN (FRANCE)
Musée de l'Homme, Place du Trocadéro, 75016 Paris -  France
* : Auteur correspondant

After its initial publication by Dubois in 1894, the working diagnosis of Homo erectus is based on a list of morphological features established and updated after successive major discoveries made in the 20th century (e.g. Le Gros Clark, 1964, Rightmire, 1991, Wood, 1991). This growing fossil record also resulted in the recognition of several distinct hominin species within the hypodigm of Homo erectus s.l., such as H. ergaster for the African specimens or H. georgicus for the Dmanisi fossils. While the existence and limits of those species are still debated, the homogeneity of the Indonesian Homo erectus, which covers a chronological period of ca. 1.5 million years, is also regularly questioned. But most of the studies addressing this question remain focused on the few best preserved specimens, although a significant number of fragmentary specimens are available for a better appreciation the encompassed morphological variability.

In this work, several unpublished fragmentary frontal (n=6) and occipital (n=9) bones recovered from the Pucangan and Kabuh layers in the Sangiran dome (Central Java) are described and analyzed. Virtual 3D models of the original specimens were reconstructed by photogrammetry and compared to the 3D models of contemporaneous (Trinil, Sangiran) and younger (Solo series) Indonesian H. erectus, specimens from Zhoukoudian Lower Cave in China, Dmanisi (Georgia), as well as East African hominins (East and West Turkana, Olduvai). The results reported here focus on the size and shape variation of the features corresponding to the supra-orbital torus and occipital torus, which are frequently used as autopomorphic traits of Homo erectus. Potential implications for the taxonomy of H. erectus will be discussed.


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